Tag: Sarah Whatley

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E-Space thematic workshops 2015

Important appointments organized by Europeana Space project in March 2015! The objective of Europeana Space is to increase and enhance the creative industries’ safe use of digital cultural content available in online repositories, by delivering a range of resources to … Continue reading


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Creative Enterprise PIE Conference

by Rosamaria Cisneros, Coventry University While participating in this interesting event, CREATIVE ENTERPRISE PIE Conference 2014 held at Belgrade Theatre Conference Venue in Coventry on the 12th November 2014, the objectives were to: (a) disseminate Dance Pilot information and tools. (b) … Continue reading


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Europeana Space poster at RICHES International Conference

Europeana Space posters have been presented at the International Conference “Cultural heritage- Recalibrating Relationships” organised by the RICHES project. The posters iarealso showcased in the Conference Digital Exhibition web page. Continue reading


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Workshop on co-creation, distributed performances and alternative content for the big screen

This workshop, co-organised by the Foundation i2CAT, the Government of Catalonia and the Theatre Institute of Barcelona,examined the gradual adoption of technological environments in the performing arts and how the expanding of bandwidth have given rise to new forms of creative expression, space for experimentation and new business models for performing arts, reaching other spaces such as movie screens and cultural institutions with the distribution of high-definition content. Sarah Whatley, dance professor and director of the Centre for Dance Research (C-Dare) at Coventry University intervened as speaker in representation of the European project RICHES. Continue reading


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Europeana Space Opening Conference

The core topic of the conference was how to enable a creative re-use of digital cultural content thus unlocking the business potential of cultural heritage and fostering the creation of new jobs and economic growth. A very interested audience almost fulfilled the parterre of the former theater, now conference venue. As a side activity, in the afetrnoon of the second day the registered participants could visit the Venice incubator H-Farm, an inspiring environment for creativity and technology. Continue reading


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Europeana Space plenary meeting, 15th October 2014

The plenary meeting of the project took place at the beautiful location of Ca’ Foscari University, one day ahead the Opening Conference of Europeana Space. After the welcome speeches by Sarah Whatley (Project Coordinator) and Leonardo Buzzavo (representing the hosting … Continue reading


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An important conference about creativity and digital cultural heritage

Antonella Fresa, Technical Coordinator of Europeana Space project, says: “This is a golden opportunity for the creative industries, for the cultural institutions, for students and researchers, for anybody interested in the new scenario of digital cultural heritage. This is the occasion to learn what is happening in this sector: join us, follow us on our blog, website and social networks!” Continue reading


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Innovate: the applied research magazine from Coventry University

The Summer 2014 issue of the Innovate magazine features a 2-page article about Europeana Space, developed by the Project’s Coordinator Sarah Whatley and by Marion Doyen, Business Development Manager at Coventry University. Continue reading


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Europeana Space at Euromed Congress 2014

Project Coordinator Professor Sarah Whatley spoke about Europeana Space project during a focused workshop, dedicated to analyse the stategies for  cultural heritage in the new digital age, held during the important congress Euromed in Cyprus (3-8 November 2014). Europeana Space was … Continue reading


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A digital archive about dance: the Siobhan Davies RePlay

Many of the objects within the archive collection have been sourced directly from Davies and her collaborators’ personal collections, whilst other items have been kindly lent by institutions and private contributors. Almost all of these objects that would otherwise remain inaccessible and unavailable appear online for the first time, and in many cases represent the first time objects have been viewed by anyone since their original date of creation. Continue reading