Interactive Wood Wall uses lights and animation to engage with children in hospital

Share

For children especially, hospitals can be anxiety-inducing and overwhelming space. New media studio ENESS aims to change that experience with their installation LUMES, a light-emitting wood piece, the first of which is now on display at Cabrini Hospital in Malvern, Australia.

Eness+Cabrini

LUMES is a light-emitting wall system that blends into surrounding architecture and reveals itself in articulate colour forms. Visitors trigger animations of landscapes and animals to the delight of children. Integrated into the building by Australian architects DesignInc, LUMES is designed to engage patients in a positive, calming environment. The interactive material straddles the worlds of art and technology, coming to life as people walk past.  According to the designers, animals peek their heads out of grass that grows with movement, animated raindrops fall on passers-by, rockets launch and animated runners follow human movements—all in bright colors displayed on natural materials.

“Our goal was to maximize the space with interactive experiences that children could intuitively use,” said Andrea Rindt, Nurse Director for Women and Children at Cabrini Hospital.

More info: http://lumes.net/about2/, http://eness.com/

 

 

Leave a Reply


Related Articles

Interaction Design students created a full-scale replica of 1968 semi-interactive installation “Coll...
from CCS's website When we talk about talking to each other in the 21st century — communication, connection — the emphasis is often on how technology enhances or diminishes personal interaction. Every day we engage with smart machines and interfaces, from phones, tablets and laptops to cars, refrigerators, Alexa and Siri. Very little of modern life remains untouched by machines capable of conversing with us and with each other. But what are the implications, and impact, of conversation...
Roberto Fazio | [B] Force - interactive installation in Florence
The intensity of a dance resides in its weightless stream of movement and harmony, and in the single beat which connects one moment to the next. Dance has the power both to give meaning to time and to create the illusion of suspending it. [B] Force is an interactive installation based on a Natural User Interface (NUI). It is inspired by the ethereal aspect of dance. Viewers leave a stream of dancing particles which follow the movements of their bodies. [B] Force 11 October to 5 November SAC...
About teamLab, Tokyo-based digital artist collaborative
teamLab, founded in 2001, is a collaborative creative group that brings together professionals from various fields of practice in the digital society: artists, programmers, engineers, CG animators, mathematicians, architects, web and print graphic designers and editors. Referring to themselves as “ultra-technologists” their aim is to achieve a balance between art, science, technology and creativity. teamLab ultratechnologists believe that digital technology can expand art and that digital art ca...
Tech and Art meet in Scenocosme
Presentation of two France-based artist, Gregory Lasserre and Anaïs met den Ancxt, working together under the name Scenocosme. In their works, Gregory and Anais develop the concept of interactivity by using multiple kind of expression: art, technology, sounds and architecture. They so design interactive artworks and choreographic collective performances where spectators share extraordinary sensory experiences.