TAKE PART in culture!

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TAKE PART

 

Collaborative approaches to culture are nowadays a current issue; they represent a valuable tool to promote democratic participation, sustainability and social cohesion by helping to address new social challenges.

On this subject, the TAKE PART project led by the AARHUS University (Denmark) is interesting: starting from studies of the different forms of participation and comparing them, the project investigates new forms of cultural participation, exploring if and how cultural, social and political participation interact. The TAKE PART network of researchers and professionals believes in the ideal of turning citizens and users into “participants”, with a key role in the arts, in cultural institutions and in society in general.

 For this reason, TAKE PART promotes exchange and collaboration between separated research environments and between theoretical and practice-oriented research; moreover, the project organizes seminars and conferences to create collaborations and strengthen the commitment of local communities and citizen.

Next international conference will be in Aarhus, Denmark, 18-20 April. For more information visit http://conferences.au.dk/culturesofparticipation2018/.

TAKE PART is a 2 years project (from 1 August 2016 to 31 July 2018) funded by The Danish Council for Independent Research.

The network has around 80 members of seven universities and 25 cultural institutions.

Project website

 

 

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