Topic: riches

Digital Heritage 2018 – 3rd International Congress & Expo

New Realities: Authenticity & Automation in the Digital Age In San Francisco, at the epicenter of the digital revolution, DigitalHERITAGE 2018 was organized with an amazing lineup of talks, exhibits, workshops, tutorials, special sessions and more, including: Internet Archive founder … Continue reading


Call for PAPERS, VIDEOS and e-EXHIBITIONS in the area of INTANGIBLE CULTURAL HERITAGE and e-ARCHIVES

MEMORIAMEDIA (MI/IELT) has a peer reviewed e-journal dedicated to promote, communicate and document projects, studies and archives of Intangible Cultural Heritage (ICH). Authors are now invited to submit unpublished papers, videos or e-exhibitions about all the domains of ICH: oral traditions, performative … Continue reading


Why IP Matters: Who Owns the Arts and Sciences?

by Catherine Cummings, Research Fellow (RICHES), University of Exeter From the shape of guitars, fashion brands, parody, dance, disability and re-mixing to museum collections, digitisation, data-mining and folklore, this interdisciplinary conference addressed the many varied and complex relationship between Intellectual … Continue reading


News from WAAG’s blog by Janine Prins

Janine Prins of WAAG Society retraces her experience as anthropologist and announces the RICHES co-creation sessions. Continue reading


Context of change for European performance practice

This study, held in the framework of the RICHES Project, wants to explore the transformation of Dance and Performance practice as a result of digital technologies within the European context. If you are a dance and performance practitioner, performer, educator, or researcher and are willing to reflect on how digital technologies have impacted on your experience of performance practice, please share with us your views by completing our survey. Continue reading


A digital archive about dance: the Siobhan Davies RePlay

Many of the objects within the archive collection have been sourced directly from Davies and her collaborators’ personal collections, whilst other items have been kindly lent by institutions and private contributors. Almost all of these objects that would otherwise remain inaccessible and unavailable appear online for the first time, and in many cases represent the first time objects have been viewed by anyone since their original date of creation. Continue reading