GHOST: Technology that leaps out of the screen

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Ghosts_EUToday we live in a world of flat-screen displays we use all day (whether it’s the computer in the office, a smartphone on the train home, the TV or iPad on the couch in the evening). The world we live in is not flat, though; it’s made of hills and valleys, people and objects. Imagine if we could use our fingertips to manipulate the display and drag features out of it into our 3D world.

Such a vision led to the launch in January 2013 of GHOST (Generic, Highly-Organic Shape-changing inTerfaces), an EU-supported research project designed to tap humans’ ability to reason about and manipulate physical objects through the interfaces of computers and mobile devices.

«This will have all sorts of implications for the future, from everyday interaction with mobile phones to learning with computers and design work – explained GHOST coordinator Professor Kasper Hornbæk of the University of Copenhagen. «It’s not only about deforming the shape of the screen, but also the digital object you want to manipulate, maybe even in mid-air. Through ultrasound levitation technology, for example, we can project the display out of the flat screen. And thanks to deformable screens we can plunge our fingers into it».

Source: ec.europa.eu

Visit the GHOST website

 

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