IT education failing future tech staff

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keyboardNew research released today reveals that current tech training is failing the generation of IT workers. The survey, conducted by Crunch, reveals 61% of tech experts agreed ‘more needs to be done to educate the next generation of technology and IT workers’.

Technology is advancing at such a speed that the education system must be reviewed and improved in order to keep pace. This is the view of 61% of tech experts that agreed that ‘more needs to be done to educate the next generation of technology and IT workers’.

The research, conducted by online accounts firm Crunch, asked people working in the technology industry about the skills and training of the next generation IT consultants.

Nearly a third of experts (30%) agree with the statement ‘tech education in the UK is not good enough’. One in 5 respondents (21%) said tech education needs a stronger focus in schools and more work is needed.  A worrying 8% said drastically more needs to be done.

What should be done to address the issue? Tech experts identified the most effective ways of up-skilling school leavers wanting to work in the technology sector. Encouraging more on the job training was identified as the strongest solution by over a third of professionals (34%) with 28% saying apprenticeships are key to boosting career paths. More government funding for practical technology skills was also a recognised by 19% of those surveyed.

Laura Hughes, Training Manager at Crunch, said: “Many of our clients work in the tech and IT industries. It’s a fast growing sector with lots of opportunities, but there’s not enough talent. This research shows that much more needs to be done in education and with businesses to build skills and generate work experience in order to encourage and inspire students into tech careers. We are seeing a big rise in developers, programmers and other technical experts starting their own businesses. They’re realising that they can make much more money freelancing than working in-house as demand continues to outstrip supply.”

The survey by Crunch Accounting polled 500 IT workers located across the UK from 1 to 22 July 2014. Full results below:

Overall, do you think enough being done to educate the next generation of technology and IT workers? Please tick the option that you most agree with

●      The future of the technology industry is in safe hands – 24%

●      The quality of education is good but more needs to be done – 31%

●      No – tech education needs a stronger focus in schools – 21%

●      No – drastically more needs to be done – 8%

●      I don’t know – 15%

What do you believe is the most effective way of up-skilling school leavers wanting to work in the technology sector?

●      Apprenticeships – 28%

●      More in-work training – 34%

●      More government funding for practical tech skills – 19%

●      Code camps and community-driven efforts – 8%

●      None of the above – 11%

 

 

About Crunch Accounting

crunch-logo-whiteCrunch is the UK’s first and fastest-growing online accountant, combining a team of expert in-house accountants available on-demand with simple online accounting software. Designed specifically for freelancers, contractors and small businesses, Crunch Accounting was co-founded by online entrepreneur Darren Fell and Accountancy Director Steve Crouch, with investment from Bebo co-founder Paul Birch. Former Skype CEO Michael van Swaaij is Crunch Chairman. Crunch are a UK Top 100 accountancy firm, and one of only two firms in the UK to offer an on-site training academy. In 2014 Crunch was named as one of four firms selected nationally by industry body IPSE as offering an outstanding service for freelancers.

 

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